Doing Buses Differently: The impact of Covid-19 on our proposals for the future of your buses

Closed 29 Jan 2021

Opened 2 Dec 2020

Results updated 30 Jan 2021

This consultation closed on Friday 29 January at 11:59pm.

Ipsos MORI is now analysing the responses and developing a consultation feedback report, which will be published alongside the GMCA’s response to the consultation.

Taking into consideration the results of both this and the previous consultation and the findings of the assessment, the Mayor of Greater Manchester will then make a decision as to whether to introduce the proposed franchising scheme, later in 2021.

Overview

 

 

Greater Manchester has an ambition for a truly integrated public transport system, Our Network, to make getting around the city-region easy, accessible and affordable. 

 

Buses will be central to Our Network. They are a vital part of Greater Manchester’s transport system, with 75% of public transport journeys – both before and during the pandemic – made by bus. For many, especially in our poorer and most vulnerable communities, they are a critical link to jobs and essential services.

Currently, the bus companies decide the routes, frequencies, fares and standards. There is no coordination and limited oversight.  Where bus companies decide not to run services and where necessary, the public sector pays to fill in the gaps. 

Franchising means bus services would be brought under local control. Greater Manchester Combined Authority (GMCA) would coordinate and invest in the bus network, while the bus operators would be contracted to run the services.  

Between October 2019 and January 2020, GMCA held a consultation on a proposed franchising scheme for the city-region’s buses. Over 8,500 of you gave us your views, with eight out of ten respondents who answered the relevant question supporting the proposed franchising scheme.

Why we are consulting

CONSULTATION DOCUMENT  (PDF VERSION)
COVID-19 IMPACT REPORT
SUPPORTING DOCUMENT

In June, GMCA received the results of the consultation and decided, before a final decision could be made that the impact of Covid-19 on the bus market and proposed franchising scheme should be considered.

Covid-19 has caused a lot of uncertainty over how people will travel in future. So, TFGM has used four scenarios in a report which looks at potential future travel demand in Greater Manchester and what it could mean for GMCA’s proposals to change how buses are run.

Under all scenarios, franchising is still the best option to achieve Greater Manchester’s long-term ambition for a fully integrated public transport system and GMCA still has funding available to pay for the transition to franchising.

Under franchising, GMCA would be responsible for the bus network and that means it would have more of the financial responsibility and the risks. Depending on the impacts of Covid-19, GMCA might have to make difficult choices about the bus network in the future to manage these financial risks - such as providing further funding or making reductions to the network.

But even under the other options available – such as entering into a partnership with bus operators or making no change to the bus market – there would still be difficult choices as GMCA would need to pay to fill more of the gaps in the commercial bus network. But GMCA would have to do this with no overall coordination and none of the other benefits of franchising.

Despite the additional financial risks, the net benefits of franchising for Greater Manchester are still likely to be higher and more deliverable than other options, such as a partnership with bus operators and so will provide value for money.

GMCA is consulting on the proposed franchising scheme in the light of the findings of the Covid-19 Impact Report.

Why proceed now?

The impact and effect of Covid-19 remains uncertain. Delaying a decision on franchising reduces the uncertainty about the impacts of Covid-19 and what partnerships operators may offer as time goes by.

But there are reasons why a decision about how buses should be run should be made sooner rather than later, as the challenges facing the bus market have not disappeared. Even before Covid-19, bus use was falling and the public sector was providing significant subsidy to operators through payments for subsidised services and concessionary fares. During the pandemic, operators have also received emergency funding from government.

If bus usage remains low in the future and central government stops or reduces its emergency funding, bus operators may reduce services or increase ticket prices. This may mean the public sector having to provide additional funding to keep essential services running, especially for key workers and the poor and vulnerable who depend on the bus network. Fewer bus routes or more expensive tickets could also mean more people driving, increasing congestion and pollution.

Audiences

  • General public

Interests

  • Transport